Hearing But Not Understanding? Special Keynote

On Friday, May 18th at 1:30PM at the EvergreenHealth, Auditorium we are hosting Dr. Jeanane Ferre Ph.D. CCC-A, a nationally recognized expert on central auditory processing disorders (CAPD), with over 35 years experience providing evaluation and treatment of CAPDs to children and adults. 

WHO: Dr. Jeanane Ferre Ph.D. CCC-A is a nationally recognized expert and pioneering researcher in Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD) in children and adults. 

WHAT: A special lecture event on evaluation and treatment of CAPD in children and adults. Individuals with CAPD have no difficulty hearing but often have difficulty understanding. Often these difficulties include listening to, comprehending, and/or remembering the information heard. Individuals with (C)APD may also experience difficulties interpreting the subtle meaning of what has been said, such as sarcasm, irony, and humor.

WHEN: Friday May 18th at 1:30PM

WHERE: EvergreenHealth Auditorium, Kirkland, WA

WHY: The Month of May is Better Hearing and Speech Month. Evergreen Speech & Hearing Clinic is excited to offer community outreach and educational events in the month of May. 

Let us know your interest in attending at rsvp@everhear.com

This talk is free to the public and highly recommended for parents, local physicians, educators, and healthcare providers. 

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Bio: Dr. Ferre established her practice in 1988, becoming one of the first audiologists in the nation to open a practice devoted exclusively to the evaluation and treatment of auditory processing disorders and has provided these services at her Oak Park office for over 20 years.

In addition to her clinical practice, she is an adjunct faculty member of Northwestern and Rush Universities, teaching graduate classes in assessment and management of CAPD and serving as an off-campus practicum supervisor to improve students’ clinical skills in the area of CAP assessment and intervention. Dr. Ferre regularly attends special education eligibility meetings and assists with development of IEPs and 504 accommodation plans. She has provided consultation on auditory processing to school districts and education departments in Illinois, Wisconsin, California, Georgia, Hawaii and the District of Columbia. Dr. Ferre is on the advisory board of Audiology Online (www.audiologyonline.com) and is a regular editorial reviewer of papers related to central auditory processing for several professional journals. She has contributed to “best practice” documents for central auditory processing assessment and intervention for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Her pioneering research in this area led to the development of the Bellis-Ferre model, currently one of the most widely used models for interpreting central auditory processing test results. She is the co-author of a widely used test for screening processing disorders among school-age children.

She has published extensively in professional journals and written chapters for collegiate texts and has given over 300 presentations on CAPD to school districts, related professionals, speech-language-hearing conferences, and parent support groups at the local, state, national and international levels.

Dr. Ferre’s work has earned numerous awards. She is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, a Fellow of the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and a Distinguished Alumnus of Illinois State University. In addition, she has received the Clinical Achievement Award and Honors of the Association from the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

 

Apps We Love

Here at ESHC, our speech-language pathologists try to make every session fun and motivating for your child. The “Toca Tea Party” app has been a huge hit, with no mess to clean up! This app is generally used with children from about ages 2-7. “Toca Tea Party” hasn’t been designed specifically for speech-pathologists, but it gets used often here at ESHC. Here’s some of the ways we incorporate it into our sessions:
• Language:
o Prepositions: Because you can move objects around, it’s a great way to incorporate targets like “in, on, out, under, next to” and more.
o Following or Giving Directions: The app is designed to simulate a tea party. Each person can pick or ask for a specific plate, cup, drink, and yummy treat to eat. It’s a great way to practice following directions like “Please give me the white cup and the pink plate.”
o Taking Turns: A child can practice taking turns by pretending to eat a snack, pouring drinks, or selecting which tablecloth to use
• Articulation
o Find words with your sound: A child may be asked find items (with the clinician’s help) that contain his/her sound. For a child working on /s/ and /z/, they can practice their sound in words like “sweet, spill”. This is also a great way to build in phonological awareness and the “sounds” within words.
o Make a sentence: To provide more context while practicing his/her sounds, the child or clinician might make a sentence about the scene on the app. This helps with attention, as the child is often more engaged than simply repeating sentences from the clinician.

5 Non-Techy Gift Ideas to Promote Kids’ Language & Learning

Non tech Gifts for Kids
It seems that a lot of children these days prefer TV, tablets and phones to the old-school toys and board games. It is true that there are technological resources that promote development of language, but we must also not forget about the play-and-learn component from our own childhoods. This holiday season, we have some ideas for non-tech (and still fun!) gifts to encourage your children’s language and learning.

1. Traditional Toys

Depending on your kiddo’s age, getting him or her a fun, colorful toy is the perfect option. According to the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association, toys that talk or make sounds discourage vocalization on the child’s part. So blocks, dolls, puzzles and trains/cars that get you and your child talking are the best bet!

2. Books

No gift list can exist without a good books. Whether it’s a book with texture for infants to touch, colorful pictures for toddlers to describe or fun poems to read, anything goes for language and development.

3. Board Games

While we all have competitive “Monopoly” players, board games are very good conversation setters. Games for every age encourage more family time, connections and fun.

4. Costumes and Props for Dress Up Play

Spark your child’s imagination with a wand, a dress or a top hat (there are other options, of course). Take photos, film videos and do what your child’s creative heart desires.

5. Art tools

Help your child build literacy skills by drawing and crafting.

Get more ideas here: Asha.org blog

Winter Wonderland at ESHC!

ww-announcement

This winter we are happy to invite you to our Winter Wonderland Days at Evergreen Speech & Hearing Clinic. Our SLP’s are excited to play games, color and make crafts with patients during their speech therapy sessions. Just schedule your regular appointments and come prepared for a lot of fun!

– Evergreen Speech Team

Animal-Assisted Speech Therapy at ESHC

Animal Assisted Speech Therapy

Maybe you’ve gotten to see Ritter, a six-year-old chocolate lab, wagging his tail as he walks down the hallway or greets patients in the waiting area and wondered, “Why is there at dog at ESHC and what does he do?” Ritter is ESHC’s Resident Therapy Dog who works with his handler and speech-language pathologist, Jennifer Dierenfeld, to assist patients in Speech/Language Therapy. Continue reading

How Parents Can Make a Difference in Treatment of Toddlers with Developmental Disorders

SLP for children with Autism

As dedicated therapists and parents, we must pay close attention to our children’s speech development. While multiple therapy sessions definitely help, it is equally important for parents to contribute to them at home, too. We want to provide you with some ideas and models on exactly what you can do to help your child’s speech development at home.

In a study by Florida State University, Dr. Amy Wetherby found “the model of teaching parents at home during individual sessions WITH their children focusing on play, daily routines like meals, snacks, chores and caregiving, along with teaching a parent how to teach a child to participate in community outings, resulted in the best outcomes for improving language, understanding, and social interaction.” – Teachmetotalk.com

These findings help to shape a few rules to guide parents in their efforts to contribute to their children’s therapy:

  1. Work with strategies provided by your SLP for 20-25 hours/week at home. 
  2. Parents should challenge their children during their interaction, especially during toddlerhood. 2-3 year olds are on the peak of their development, and can get the biggest benefits from therapy.
  3. Early intervention is key. If parents know or suspect their child has a developmental disorder, they must act quickly to ensure successful development.

Sources:

The original copy of this article was published on teachmetotalk.com, and is based on the Florida State study by Dr. Amy Wetherby.

A. M. Wetherby, W. Guthrie, J. Woods, C. Schatschneider, R. D. Holland, L. Morgan, C. Lord. Parent-Implemented Social Intervention for Toddlers With Autism: An RCT. PEDIATRICS, 2014; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2014-0757

Speech Disorders in Multilingual Children

 Speech Disorders in Bilingual Children

Author: Bridget Griffin

The multi-cultural society we live in today brings our children many benefits, including first-hand experience in diversity, exposure to human differences and more rounded education. It is no question that speaking multiple languages is helpful in this modern world, but doing so at an early stage of development can bring about some challenges. Let’s see some of the common misconceptions about bilingualism in childhood, as told by our very own Bridget Griffin, Speech Language Pathologist.

1. Myth or Fact: Multilingual children develop speech and language later than their monolinguals peers.

Myth! Similar to monolingual children, most multilingual children speak their first words by 12 months. By age two, a majority of both monolingual and multilingual children are combining words into two-word phrases. As speech and language develops, multilingual children may sometimes mix up grammatical rules or use words from both languages within the same phrase or sentence. Additionally, when a second language is first introduced, some multilingual children experience a “silent period” or “non-verbal” period where they do not speak much. This may last anywhere from a couple of weeks to several months. This is a normal stage of multilingual language development where children are absorbing and making sense of the rules of their new language, including speech sounds, vocabulary, and grammatical structures. Just as with monolingual children, multilingual children are most successful developing language with exposure, practice, and positive communication with their families and peers.

2. Myth or Fact: Children with language disorders cannot learn multiple languages.

Continue reading

The Role of Collaboration in our Practice

speech-team

Whether you are a returning or new patient, you have probably heard about our belief in a collaborative approach to treatments. In order to provide you with the best service possible and get to the heart of the problem, we use this unique approach. Here is how it works:

You get two language-speech pathologists

This approach allows for multiple communication partners, increased accountability, sharing of ideas, and development of more creative and effective treatment plans.

Generalization

One of the most difficult parts of the treatment is taking the skills learned during therapy and applying them in the patients’ day-to-day activities. Practicing with two different therapists can help them learn how to communicate with multiple communication partners and apply newly acquired skills in a different setting.

Therapists’ Weekly Meetings

As part of the behind-the-scenes work, our therapists meet once a week to brainstorm ideas, ask for input and agree on a treatment plan for each of their patients. By creating this interactive dialogue, all our therapists play an active role in the patients’ wellness plan.

SOAP Notes

Besides having a memorable name, our SOAP notes system is a way to to record each patient’s documentation, progress, concerns and session notes in a reliable, systematic way. After each visit, patients get a detailed performance report with narrative text about the session, its specific successes and challenges, and a plan for the next visit. All documentation is checked and updated by our therapists to ensure that each patient’s treatment is on track and working.

Overall, we hold our collaboration approach to treatments at the highest value and often see positive results thanks to it. Feel free to ask us any questions regarding our technique in the comments below or on Facebook our speech team would be happy to answer.

Child Development Tips from Thirty Million Words Initiative

30 million words
We at Evergreen Speech and Hearing Clinic are big fans of the Thirty Million Words® Initiative. It is “an innovative parent-directed program designed to harness the power of parent language to build a child’s brain and impact his or her future”.

What is Thirty Million Words®?

The program is based on a world-famous 1995 study by researchers Betty Hart and Todd Risley, who found that some children heard much less words by 4th grade than others. This negatively impacted their vocabularies, reading skills and overall preparedness for school. Children who were exposed to more communication in their younger age, however, were found to be more successful. The bottom line is that children who started out ahead, stayed ahead even throughout their high school years. TMW call this disparity an achievement gap. The initiative’s main goal is to promote better communication between parents and kids, and help close this gap.

Since we discovered Thirty Million Words, we’ve been dying to share some of their tips with you. There are no age restrictions, complicated strategies or doctor sessions involved, which is why the initiative’s 3 T’s are simple and doable steps to help your child grow.

3Ts Thirty Million Words

1. Tune In

… by paying attention to what your child is communicating to you.

2. Talk More

… with your child using descriptive words to build his vocabulary.

3. Take Turns

… by encouraging your child to respond to your words and actions.


Big thanks to the TMW for providing this great printable version of the 3T’s and the information above. Feel free to ask us or our therapists any questions regarding this initiative.

Story Camp Begins Next Week!

story camp blog picture

It is with oodles of excitement that ESHC introduces its first ever summer Story Camp (Aug. 1-5). Next week, the kiddos will be introduced to an African folk tale filled with fun and funny themes. With the help of the speech team, they will be guided through fun and engaging activities that tie back to the folk tale to promote sequencing skills, oral narrative skills, story grammar skills, and just-being-a-kid skills (there will be water balloons!). Camp was always the highlight of my summer when I [Mandee Parker, SLP] was younger, and I’m inspired to be able to provide that for these incredible kids!